History of Nigeria
Precolonial History
Colonial History
Independence
Post Independence History
Historical Figures
Home




Post Independence History of Nigeria

Nigeria was granted full independence in October 1960, as a federation of three regions (northern, western, and eastern) under a constitution that provided for a parliamentary form of government. Under the constitution, each of the three regions retained a substantial measure of self-government.

The emergence of a democratic Nigeria in May 1999 ended 16 years of consecutive military rule. Olusegun Obasanjo became the steward of a country suffering economic stagnation and the deterioration of most of its democratic institutions. Obasanjo, a former general, was admired for his stand against the Abacha dictatorship, his record of returning the federal government to civilian rule in 1979, and his claim to represent all Nigerians regardless of religion.

The new President took over a country that faced many problems, including a dysfunctional bureaucracy, collapsed infrastructure, and a military that wanted a reward for returning quietly to the barracks. The President moved quickly and retired hundreds of military officers who held political positions, established a blue-ribbon panel to investigate human rights violations, ordered the release of scores of persons held without charge, and rescinded a number of questionable licenses and contracts let by the previous military regimes. The government also moved to recover millions of dollars in funds secreted in overseas accounts.







Kingdoms of Nigeria is a Nigerian organization dedicated to advancing Nigeria, its people and their rich and diverse culture. Kingdoms of Nigeria is always interested in receiving information comments and suggestions from positive patrons (especially Nigerians at home or in Diaspora). All communications with Kingdoms of Nigeria will be subject to the Kingdoms of Nigeria privacy policy and Legal Notices available on this web site.